TECH TALK: Ableton & Serato to release new software

UPDATE: The wait is over!!! According to Ableton.com, the new product is officially named “The Bridge”.

ABLETON TO SERATO: “The Bridge provides Ableton Transport Control (ATC), giving you turntable-style control of your own multitrack productions. Simply drag an Ableton Live Set to a deck in Scratch Live or ITCH and use your turntables, CDJ or ITCH controller to control the transport. With ATC, Scratch Live or ITCH provides your productions with deck control, mixing, nudging and DJ style looping, while you can remix, mute/solo tracks, use virtual instruments, change drum patterns, manipulate audio, tweak effects and launch loops on the fly in Ableton Live.”

SERATO TO ABLETON: “Play your mix rather than cut and paste in a DAW. Forget about having to start a mixtape from scratch because of a mistake at minute fifty-nine. The Bridge is the ultimate mixtape creation tool, letting you export your Scratch Live or ITCH mix as an Ableton Live set. Depending on your Serato hardware setup, fader movements, EQ tweaks and Crossfader cuts on your DJ mixer are recorded as automation and can be edited after the tape stops rolling.”

The Bridge is free for anyone who owns both:

  • A registered version of Serato Scratch Live or ITCH hardware and
  • Ableton Live 8 or Suite 8

Check out the video after the jump to see what the hype is all about:

(Originally posted 01.12.2010)

On October 16, 2008 Ableton & Serato had announced that they were partnering in order to bring digital DJs a revolutionary way of looking at DJing as a performance medium.

“With shared artist rosters from hip-hop (DJ Jazzy Jeff, DJ Nu-Mark, A-trak) to electronica (Paul Van Dyke, DJ Sasha), both Ableton Live and Serato Scratch Live are reknowned as the premier performance platforms in clubs around the globe. While Serato’s Scratch Live excels in vinyl emulation, music library control and lightning-quick hands-on scratching, Ableton Live provides the tools for production, on-the-fly remixing and beat creation.

“Ableton and Serato take different approaches to modern musical performance,” says Ableton CEO Gerhard Behles, “But both companies live by the philosophy that software should be straightforward, easy to use, and most importantly, reliable and stable onstage and in the studio. Ableton has never had an answer for the Dj who wants vinyl control, and rather than try to emulate what Serato does so well, we simply make sure our products work together.”

Serato Audio Research CEO Steve West agrees. “After years of talking together, we’re thrilled to be working with Ableton. It’s exciting to think about what we can offer to DJs and Producers: the ability to go beyond just spinning records and add a personal stamp to the music they play.”"

Originally slated to go live on 01.14.10, the site claims that “despite numerous boardroom meetings & cross-continental flights, these two music titans are still in disagreement on some last minute product decisions”, so they’re getting together on 01.16.10 to hash it out on the courts in a good ol’ fashioned street ball tourney down in Anaheim.

I’ve been a heavy Ableton user for almost 2 years now and a strong proponent for folks that want to use Live as their DJ platform, to really focus more on the performance aspects if the turntables, vinyl & live DJ element is being taken out.

I’ve seen some of these so-called-DJs, get booked, come out to play and just set the beat markers in, get all their songs queued up and basically hit “Play” and move the mouse back and forth with maybe, MAYBE a little EQ or filtering tricks thrown in there.

All in all- it’s a super boring experience and makes a really bad name for performance-based electronic artists out there.

I’ll be excited to see this release hit the market and even more excited to hear what all of you you have to say about it once you get your hands on a copy, so be sure to come back and let us know!

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